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A House that Has Everything

Rating:
2.9 / 5

Words & Music: Sid Tepper Roy C. Bennett

I can see you now living like a queen
In a house that has everything, everything but love
Crystal chandeliers, chauffeured limousines
Yes you'll really have everything, everything but love

I see diamonds, sables, sapphires and pearls
And as the picture clears
Poor little rich girl sitting all alone
Counting her treasures in tears
Better just a shack where two people care
Than a house that has everything, everything but love

I see diamonds, sables, sapphires and pearls
And as the picture clears
Poor little rich girl sitting all alone
Counting her treasures in tears
Better just a shack where two people care
Than a house that has everything, everything but love
Than a house that has everything, everything but love

Recordingdate: 1967/02/21, first released on: Clambake (album)

Musicians

Musicians who contributed to the first recording of A House that Has Everything:

(guitar)
(guitar)
(guitar)
(steel guitar)
(bass)
(drums)
(drums)
(piano)
(piano)
(harmonica)
(vocals)
(vocals)
(vocals)
(vocals)
(vocals)
(sax)

Availability

Find available albums with A House that Has Everything.

Jerome wrote on June 16, 2008
a grand life lesson packed in an enjoyable but little song..
derekd wrote on May 29, 2009
Elvis in fine voice, but the song is nothing special, but Elvis turns it into a fine recording, one of the few film song from '67 that i would listen to.
theoldscudder wrote on May 29, 2009
Trite. Never listen to this.
Steve V wrote on May 29, 2009
Terrible for 1967. It sounded like it belonged to the stone age compared to what was going in in the real music world.
NONE000000 wrote on May 29, 2009
I agree that compared to what was going on musically in 1967 (the summer of love, I believe) this is pretty irrelevant. However, my feeling toward a lot of Elvis' 60's output is that it was almost so absolutely out of time with everything it achieves a weird timelessness. In other words, "Strawberry Fields Forever" sounds like a 60's song, but "House That Has Everything" sounds like it could have been recorded yesterday or 100 years ago. And a lot of the movie songs do have that going for it. Aside from that, I think this track is one of the better ones from "Clambake". It certainly edges out "Hey Hey Hey" and "Confidence"....so that is rather faint praise. Still, I think this one is decent, and as usual, Elvis' voice transcends the material.
dgirl wrote on May 29, 2009
Elvis was still stuck in soundtrack hell in 1967 with Tepper/Bennett songs like this. He needed real music from real writers who had their pulse on what was going on. This Lp was almost a career killer.
JerryNodak wrote on May 30, 2009
I enjoy the "Clambake" album. When you're recording soundtrack songs they're NOT going to be connected to the mainstream. WHY? Because they're connected to the scenes they're written for. That was okay with me. I went to Elvis movies to escape the real world which was going to hell in a hand basket, then as now. As for this song: It's a life lesson wrapped in a nice, pleasant song which Elvis sings well. That's enough for me.
Ruthie wrote on May 30, 2009
Granted, this is just a little song, nothing special. But, at least it made sense. And tunes like Strawberry Fields never did make any sense to me. Sounded like something written in a drug induced stupor. Today, when I hear it, I still can't make sense of it. But that was indicative of what was being written then. Only got worse in the 70's. I will take a meaningless song like this over the morbidity any day.
Deano1 wrote on February 22, 2010
A well rendered ballad from the movie and soundtrack "Clambake". This album in no way almost killed his career, in fact it shows things had started to change since the previous soundtrack LP, "Double Trouble" had not met with the expected sales. This album had a bonus song leading off the album and side B is a very good with "You Don't Know Me", "The Girl I Never Loved", "Big Boss Man", "Singing Tree" and "Just Call Me Lonesome", even "How Can You Lose What You Never Had" is decent. Side A had "Guitar Man", this fine ballad and three average situational movie songs and one terrible song "Hey, Hey Hey". The great thing is that it was the last song and you could just eject the record at that point.
Gorse wrote on November 28, 2012
I like a lot of Elvis film ballads and although they are not pop trailblazers, this is one of them. This has a nice tune, that is well sung by Elvis in his soft warm velvety voice and an interesting steel guitar interlude.
sugartummy wrote on February 22, 2013
Elvis tries to make the best of it, and he succeeds. In other people hands this was not listenable.
Cruiser621 wrote on February 26, 2019
5-stars and it's from the "Clambake" film and soundtrack. I really like this song; would have been a decent tune on a non-soundtrack album. Unfortunately it's on one of his worst soundtracks which has some real drivel on it aka "Hey! Hey! Hey!"
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